Do you struggle to make students understand that Googling is not research? Me, too. I have a method to teach students research in small bites and at the end, they are published website authors! Click through to get my step-by-step instructions for how I implement it, video tutorial for Easy Bib, and cheat sheet for building a Google Site!

My count-down to summer series this year is all about teaching those unfamiliar beings in our classrooms popularly referred to as Generation Z. Last week, I discussed how I make lecture work for them. This week is all about research.

In the introduction to this series, I identified five traits they collectively share (give or take):

1. They have smaller attention spans than previous generations.
2. There's a lot of "noise" in their lives. They don't always listen unless we are addressing them directly (one-on-one).
3. They are more interested in what "real people" are doing (on social media platforms like YouTube) than in popular television shows or movies.
4. They never, ever have to be bored and don't expect to be.
5. They already are, or anticipate being, entrepreneurs.

Do you struggle to make students understand that Googling is not research? Me, too. I have a method to teach students research in small bites and at the end, they are published website authors! Click through to get my step-by-step instructions for how I implement it, video tutorial for Easy Bib, and cheat sheet for building a Google Site!
I'm going to take these sweeping traits and explain how I make research work for them.

Our students have access to infinite amounts of information in their pockets (literally). Our jobs have become less about teaching them the information--they already have it--and more about teaching them how to sift through and organize it all.

They need to learn the difference between "googling" and actual research, the difference between primary and secondary sources, the difference between fact and opinion, etc. But it's all too easy to lose their attention when teaching them these skills.

This year, my colleagues and I played on our students' entrepreneurial desires in order to do all of this, and in true Gen Z fashion, we broke it into digestible bites.

The goal of our historical research (though it can apply to other subjects) was to develop an opinion based on research about a question they had, and to create and publish a website. We broke it down into steps and charged them with executing one step each day.

Here's How We Did It:

Do you struggle to make students understand that Googling is not research? Me, too. I have a method to teach students research in small bites and at the end, they are published website authors! Click through to get my step-by-step instructions for how I implement it, video tutorial for Easy Bib, and cheat sheet for building a Google Site!
Example Template
Day 1: Select a Topic, Generate a Question, and Research

1. We had already completed a unit on the Renaissance and the Age of Exploration. Students selected
a thinker, artist, or explorer from that time and decided what specifically they would like to know about them (they generated a question).

2.  Students used databases (Galileo and Gale) to research that question. They were charged with finding one primary and two secondary sources (at the beginning of the year, we did this lesson to help students differentiate between the two and worked all year on analyzing primary sources).

3. To prepare them to create an annotated bibliography on a later date, they had to describe what each resource was about and to explain what they learned from it.

Do you struggle to make students understand that Googling is not research? Me, too. I have a method to teach students research in small bites and at the end, they are published website authors! Click through to get my step-by-step instructions for how I implement it, video tutorial for Easy Bib, and cheat sheet for building a Google Site!
Example Template
Day 2: Generate a Thesis Statement

1. Students had to develop an opinion about their topic (an answer to their question based on their research). They had to state what that opinion was and give three reasons that supported that opinion. A note here: ideally, we are getting away from the three-prong thesis statement--it's too formulaic. But we are using it here as a tool to teach students how to construct one. With more practice, we will guide students through synthesizing their three prongs into a concise idea.

Do you struggle to make students understand that Googling is not research? Me, too. I have a method to teach students research in small bites and at the end, they are published website authors! Click through to get my step-by-step instructions for how I implement it, video tutorial for Easy Bib, and cheat sheet for building a Google Site!
Example Template
Day 3: Design Your Website

1. We explained to students that they would not be
building their website yet. They were simply using their research and thesis statement to plan their website (the word "design" evokes creative entrepreneurial images, so we used that).

2. The website would have five pages. Page one is the introduction and thesis statement. Then there are three pages for each prong. Finally, there is a page for the conclusion and annotated bibliography.

Do you struggle to make students understand that Googling is not research? Me, too. I have a method to teach students research in small bites and at the end, they are published website authors! Click through to get my step-by-step instructions for how I implement it, video tutorial for Easy Bib, and cheat sheet for building a Google Site!
Example Template
Day 4: Create Your Annotated Bibliography

This is the most painful part for students. My colleague, Joy, designed an example that helped. The National History Day Website also has examples and instructions that are incredibly beneficial.

1. Students took their sources from day one and plugged everything onto a template. They had to use MLA formatting, so we showed them how to get this from Galileo and Gale. If they used a source from elsewhere (with our permission), we had them use the Easy Bib Add-On in Google Docs to get the correct formatting. Here's a tutorial I created for using that.

2. Students used the research they did on day one to create their annotations. Then they plugged everything in to a copy of Joy's example in Google Docs. This helped because they really struggle with bibliography formatting.

Day 5: Build You Website

1. We gave students a copy of this cheat sheet to show them how to build a Google Site. I like Google Sites because they are user-friendly and safe. You can set them so that they are only available to people inside your organization.

Do you struggle to make students understand that Googling is not research? Me, too. I have a method to teach students research in small bites and at the end, they are published website authors! Click through to get my step-by-step instructions for how I implement it, video tutorial for Easy Bib, and cheat sheet for building a Google Site!
Grab The Cheat Sheet HERE!
2. Students used the Design Your Website template that they filled out on day three to plug everything in to their Google Site.


Day 6: Peer Review

Do you struggle to make students understand that Googling is not research? Me, too. I have a method to teach students research in small bites and at the end, they are published website authors! Click through to get my step-by-step instructions for how I implement it, video tutorial for Easy Bib, and cheat sheet for building a Google Site!
Example Template
1. We took students to the media center and had them pull up their websites on the computers. They

used a handout to go around and review each others' websites (we required them to review 10). This worked really well when there was only one class in the media center, but when we combined classes, it got a little chaotic. An alternative to avoid that would be to put the website links in Google Classroom and assign each student specific ones to review.

Day 7: Peer Review Feedback and Editing

1. Students met briefly with the author of the websites they reviewed.

2. Students had time to make changes before sharing the final link of the published website with the teacher.

So here is how this spin on research speaks to Gen Z:

1. They have smaller attention spans than previous generations. Each day, the students are focused on one component of a much larger research project. It's in small bites that they can digest. With practice, they will be able to take on a full research project at once, complete with choices of product and longer bibliographies.

2. There's a lot of "noise" in their lives. They don't always listen unless we are addressing them directly (one-on-one). The templates and laser-focused tasks free the teacher up to work with students individually. Students who "get it" faster and finish early can become "experts" to help struggling students one-on-one. I use the student as teacher model sparingly, but this is an instance in which it benefits everyone (concepts are reinforced by explaining for both parties).

3. They are more interested in what "real people" are doing (on social media platforms like YouTube) than in popular television shows or movies. Students review each others' published websites.This is a real-world social media event.

4. They never, ever have to be bored and don't expect to be. It's more difficult to be bored when students are engaged in researching and answering a question they have asked about a topic they have chosen.

5. They already are, or anticipate being, entrepreneurs. They are creating a website--my students get pretty excited about this. They are the authors, the "webmasters." One of my students who has been particularly challenging to engage this year commented about his website, "This looks professional."

Tips For Implementing The Research:

-Never assume students will be able to do something just because it's technological. These kids are digital natives, but technology is an enormous bag of goods. Nobody has grabbed everything from it.

-It is vital that students have the appropriate background before embarking on research. They need to understand the difference between primary and secondary sources, understand source citation and annotation, and understand the pitfalls of plagiarism. They also need to understand images and copyright issues. These are things we embed into our lessons all year.

-Make sure students have access to the rubric from the beginning, but assign each template on the given day. Students will sometimes try to work ahead and miss vital components of the process.

How do you break up research for Gen Z? Leave a comment and let me know!

Be sure to check out all of the posts in this series on teaching Gen Z for helpful tips and tricks: 








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Do you ever find yourself struggling to reach your students? I know I do! Here I'm discussing how I have started tweaking my lectures to make them more accessible to Generation Z. Click through to find out what I do!

My count-down to summer series this year is all about teaching those unfamiliar beings in our classrooms popularly referred to as Generation Z.

In the introduction to this series, I identified five traits they collectively share (give or take):

1. They have smaller attention spans than previous generations.
2. There's a lot of "noise" in their lives. They don't always listen unless we are addressing them directly (one-on-one).
3. They are more interested in what "real people" are doing (on social media platforms like YouTube) than in popular television shows or movies.
4. They never, ever have to be bored and don't expect to be.
5. They already are, or anticipate being, entrepreneurs.

I'm going to take these sweeping traits and explain how I make the humble lecture work for them.

I haven't met many students from this generation (or any other, for that matter) who get excited about a good old-fashioned lecture. I enjoy them if the speaker is engaging, but if the speaker is not engaging, they can be downright painful. And let's face it, no teacher can be an engaging speaker 100% of the time (especially if it's our fifth time delivering the same content on a Friday afternoon).

Do you ever find yourself struggling to reach your students? I know I do! Here I'm discussing how I have started tweaking my lectures to make them more accessible to Generation Z. Click through to find out what I do! But often, we have a large amount of content to deliver and lecture is the quickest way to do it. Sure, you can flip your classroom and focus on projects in class, but that's not practical for many of us. You can teach content through an inquiry-based approach, but in the world of standardized tests, sometimes we just need to give our students information.

In world history, I have a lot of content that I need to deliver to my students. The majority of them will not learn it on their own. They will not listen to me for long, either.

One way I've gotten around this dilemma is to turn a lengthy lecture into stations. There are many ways you can do this, but here are two methods that have worked well for me:

Method 1:

-Break up your lecture into sections.

-Use a free app like Screencastify to record each section of notes. Briefly explain each part and tell a couple of stories for each section. If more than one of you in your school teach the same subject, break it up among yourselves and share the work (a colleague of mine and I recently did this with a lengthy lecture on Classical Greece--half the work for each of us, win/win).

-Give students a handout with as many parts as you have sections. For each part, ask students to interact with the notes from that section in some way (create causes and effects, place a sequence of events in order, create a storyboard, etc.). Also, be sure to have students summarize each section and ask a question about it. Often students tell me they don't have a question--they understand everything. I tell them that's a sign that they're not really thinking about the material. There should always be questions if they are doing their job. These questions are fantastic starting points for future research.
Do you ever find yourself struggling to reach your students? I know I do! Here I'm discussing how I have started tweaking my lectures to make them more accessible to Generation Z. Click through to find out what I do!
-Have one section per station. I keep station time for this to between 15 and 20 minutes, and I use the timer on Classroomscreen to time them. When it goes off, they rotate to the next station.

Method 2:

-Break up your lecture into alternate activities. Examples are task cards, QR Code Scavenger Hunts, HyperDocs, card sorts, short films, games, primary source analysis, mini gallery walks, short textbook readings, etc.

-These stations generally take longer but they engage the students in actively accumulating information.

-Have a reflection sheet on which they can summarize and ask a question, as well.

Here is how I grade the completed reflection sheet:

-Students can get up to 5 points for each station. I add them up and use an Easy Grader to assign a score out of 100.

Do you ever find yourself struggling to reach your students? I know I do! Here I'm discussing how I have started tweaking my lectures to make them more accessible to Generation Z. Click through to find out what I do!

So here is how this spin on the lecture speaks to Gen Z:

1. They have smaller attention spans than previous generations. The stations are broken into bits. Students are only asked to grab a bite of information at a time. They are required to take time to savor that bite with the reflection sheet. Then they move on to something else.

2. There's a lot of "noise" in their lives. They don't always listen unless we are addressing them directly (one-on-one). Since the teacher is freed up to move around the stations and check progress, there is ample time to speak with individuals, correct misconceptions, and expound on areas of personal interest.

3. They are more interested in what "real people" are doing (on social media platforms like YouTube) than in popular television shows or movies. I equate the teacher lecturing to TV--impersonal, and yet a shared experience. Moving through the stations in small groups enables students to discuss with their peers and speak with their teacher in a more personalized, impromptu setting.

4. They never, ever have to be bored and don't expect to be. Frequent station changes can at most prevent boredom and at least shorten it.

5. They already are, or anticipate being, entrepreneurs. The reflections should not be done in isolation--they should be a springboard for future research and creation. I'm quick to tell a student as I'm "making the rounds" that I didn't know the answer--I had to look it up. "Stump me," I'll challenge them. This is fun for me, it models what learning is for students, and it provides ample material for future research and creation on their part.

Tips For Implementing The Stations:

-You can assign stations on a digital platform, such as Google Classroom, but I recommend having a printed handout for each station stapled to a folder. Then you can put anything students need for that station inside the folder. I have done it both ways and found that students do better with a tangible handout for instructions. They can hold it and refer back to it as often as necessary. You can do a bit link for anything digital they need to access. I'm not 100% sure why the handout works so much better than digital directions--perhaps digital directions are just more "noise" to them.

-You can also certainly do the reflection sheet digitally, but I also find that it works better with students if it's printed on a sheet of paper--they are less likely to leave spaces blank if they can hold it and interact with it.

-Even if the stations are digital, have a physical space in the classroom for students to move to. Movement is engaging and so is a change of atmosphere--even if it's a small one. They spend so much time sitting and staring at screens--they pay more attention to a new task in a different location.

-Take up the reflection sheet each day (because the stations will probably stretch over more than one day). Put a check on things that are good. Put an X on things that aren't so good. Leave comments and suggestions. Gen Z wants feedback, and they want it now! If students choose to revise, take that into consideration when you give the completed station work a grade.

How do you break up your lessons for Gen Z? Leave a comment and let me know!

Be sure to check out all of the posts in this series on teaching Gen Z for helpful tips and tricks: 








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As teachers, even if we swore we wouldn't, we sometimes find ourselves saying, "Kids these days!" And with good reason. Generations change, and more rapidly than ever before with rapid technological shifts. Check out this introduction to a new series on reaching the latest generation--Gen Z. Click through, my fellow educators, and we'll strategize together.

Every year since 2015, I've done a spring series that counts down to summer. Last year, I discussed Simple Spring Engagement Tips. Before that, I did Spring Tech Tips. In 2016, I did Google Classroom Hacks, and way, way back in the balmy days of 2015, we all learned about some Spring Survival Tips together.

So with six weeks left until that glorious moment each year called summer break, I am bringing you an all new summer countdown.

Tips for Teaching Gen Z

I always make these spring series about what's been at the forefront of mine and my colleagues' minds. This year is no different. One thing we have all been commenting on lately is how, well, different the students are now.

And that's a result of a few things:

As teachers, even if we swore we wouldn't, we sometimes find ourselves saying, "Kids these days!" And with good reason. Generations change, and more rapidly than ever before with rapid technological shifts. Check out this introduction to a new series on reaching the latest generation--Gen Z. Click through, my fellow educators, and we'll strategize together.
1. Adults have been saying this about children since time immemorial. I'm sure we always will. I love
Mark Twain's saying that "The past doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes." How true, and it's sprung an all new verse with Gen Z.
2. The paradox that the only thing constant is change is true.
3. We have a new generation on our hands, so Millennials, step aside for Gen Z--they're officially here.

Generations as we know them (i.e. The Greatest, Boomers, Gen X, Millennials, and now Gen Z) are largely a product of advertising. But it's a useful product. We love to group people, look for commonalities, and in some cases, market to them.

And, idealistic notions about education aside (which I still do have), we are marketing to our students in a sense. We are teaching them a curriculum the value of which we expect them to accept. In order to "sell" that acceptance (because this generation does not accept "just because"--whether they "just should" is a conversation for another day and something largely out of our control as educators).

As teachers, even if we swore we wouldn't, we sometimes find ourselves saying, "Kids these days!" And with good reason. Generations change, and more rapidly than ever before with rapid technological shifts. Check out this introduction to a new series on reaching the latest generation--Gen Z. Click through, my fellow educators, and we'll strategize together.
So who exactly is Gen Z? Well, they were born in the mid nineties and on. We secondary educators began to see them in our classrooms at the end of the first decade of the 21st century. I noticed a moderate shift in student attitudes and expectations about then. But as they have come of age, I have noticed a major shift. I haven't spoken to a single teacher who has been in the classroom for over 10 years who hasn't noticed this.

Here are some observations that I (and people way smarter than me) have made about Gen Z:

1. They have smaller attention spans than previous generations.
2. There's a lot of "noise" in their lives. They don't always listen unless we are addressing them directly (one-on-one).
3. They are more interested in what "real people" are doing (on social media platforms like YouTube) than in popular television shows or movies.
4. They never, ever have to be bored and don't expect to be.
5. They already are, or anticipate being, entrepreneurs.

Over the next five weeks, I intend to discuss how we can capitalize on these characteristics in the classroom, rather than just lament (as I am prone to doing) how much "kids these days" have changed.

I hope that this is a useful series for veteran and new teachers alike. I'll have ideas that you can use in your classroom immediately in these last, trying days before summer vacation.

Be sure to check back in next week for a really important one--Tweaking Lengthy Lectures for Micro Attention Spans. I hope to see you then!

And be sure to comment below about some of the biggest changes you have noticed in this new generation of kiddos and strategies you have for reaching them.

And be sure to check out all of the posts in this series for tips and tricks for teaching Gen Z:


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