Tuesday, July 26, 2016

1:1 Ready: Teaching Digital Citizens

What have you taught your students about digital citizenship? There's a lot of groundwork that needs to be laid before we can jump right into a 1:1 classroom. Teachers can't assume that students know about copyright laws and plagiarism, and they also can't assume that students have been taught how to use the Internet safely. This post will help you get your classroom ready for 1:1 technology integration by giving you tips for teaching these important concepts.
As teachers, most of us have more content than we can possibly teach well, let alone cover, in the time allotted to us.

Time has always been our enemy, but now we see 1:1 on the horizon, and a blended classroom promises to alleviate much of that stress. It is easier to flip, differentiate, assess, and grade than ever before.

But with these blessings comes a new burden—the burden of teaching our students to behave responsibly in the digital realm. We must now teach our students digital citizenship.

There are many components of digital citizenship, but I would define it simply as learning to behave responsibly in the digital realm.

Responsible digital behavior has several basic components, including but not limited to:

1.       
What have you taught your students about digital citizenship? There's a lot of groundwork that needs to be laid before we can jump right into a 1:1 classroom. Teachers can't assume that students know about copyright laws and plagiarism, and they also can't assume that students have been taught how to use the Internet safely. This post will help you get your classroom ready for 1:1 technology integration by giving you tips for teaching these important concepts.

Students should maintain respect for one another and their devices at all times. They should refrain from harmful language and cyber-bullying. They should clean and care for their devices.
    
What have you taught your students about digital citizenship? There's a lot of groundwork that needs to be laid before we can jump right into a 1:1 classroom. Teachers can't assume that students know about copyright laws and plagiarism, and they also can't assume that students have been taught how to use the Internet safely. This post will help you get your classroom ready for 1:1 technology integration by giving you tips for teaching these important concepts.

Students should understand that people they encounter online are not their friends and that conversations with friends online are not private. They should know never to disclose personal information such as location and passwords. They should understand the danger of meeting someone they met online in the real world.

What have you taught your students about digital citizenship? There's a lot of groundwork that needs to be laid before we can jump right into a 1:1 classroom. Teachers can't assume that students know about copyright laws and plagiarism, and they also can't assume that students have been taught how to use the Internet safely. This post will help you get your classroom ready for 1:1 technology integration by giving you tips for teaching these important concepts.

Students should be aware of intellectual property laws and understand how to properly credit a source. They should understand that illegal downloading and sharing is theft.

What have you taught your students about digital citizenship? There's a lot of groundwork that needs to be laid before we can jump right into a 1:1 classroom. Teachers can't assume that students know about copyright laws and plagiarism, and they also can't assume that students have been taught how to use the Internet safely. This post will help you get your classroom ready for 1:1 technology integration by giving you tips for teaching these important concepts.

     Students should understand that anything that they share, text, or upload will not go away. They should be aware of the permanence of their digital reputations and that it will stay with them for the rest of their lives.

What have you taught your students about digital citizenship? There's a lot of groundwork that needs to be laid before we can jump right into a 1:1 classroom. Teachers can't assume that students know about copyright laws and plagiarism, and they also can't assume that students have been taught how to use the Internet safely. This post will help you get your classroom ready for 1:1 technology integration by giving you tips for teaching these important concepts.

Students should be responsible with their internet use. They should not allow the digital world to consume them at the expense of real-world relationships. They should also be responsible with the sources they choose to trust and practice fact-checking.


 Download this FREE Sign (in color and black and white) and accompanying note page to remind students about the importance of these five components of digital citizenship for free HERE.

I spoke to other teachers (the type in the trenches) who are going 1:1 this fall about the need to teach digital citizenship (they all have blogs that I find immensely useful, so I’ve linked to them for you below, just click on their names), and here’s what they had to say.

Brittany Washburn, a science and technology specials teacher for grades 2-5, said:

Have you all seen the new ISTE standard 2 for digital citizenship? It's really intense wording. "Permanence of my actions" "legal and ethical behavior" "obligations of sharing intellectual property" "maintain digital privacy and security". They aren't messing around.
Starting the school year with digital citizenship when you're in a 1:1 classroom is so important to setting expectations.

Danielle Knight, a pioneer in creating digital interactive notebooks, and a secondary ELA special education teacher, said:

I try to instill the values in my students about credibility and what to believe online.

Danielle has an excellent point. How many of your students believe everything that they see online? The infamous Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus is a clever example of that. We must teach our students to be discerning—now more than ever in this age of information overload.

Christina Schneider, a secondary ELA teacher, made an excellent point:

I don't think students always come to us with this as background knowledge. Just think about how many emails you've received in the past from your district's IT dept. warning teachers not to click on a certain link...
As we use more digital teaching tools in the classroom, it is important to also teach our students about digital citizenship. Today's youth need to know the written, as well as the unwritten, rules of the Internet so that they can be effective and productive collaborators in the digital world.
I will teach digital citizenship to my students this year by introducing them to a Digital Citizenship Mini Flip Book. This mini flip book will cover different aspects of digital citizenship, from laws to passwords, so that they can be digitally aware.

What have you taught your students about digital citizenship? There's a lot of groundwork that needs to be laid before we can jump right into a 1:1 classroom. Teachers can't assume that students know about copyright laws and plagiarism, and they also can't assume that students have been taught how to use the Internet safely. This post will help you get your classroom ready for 1:1 technology integration by giving you tips for teaching these important concepts.
Get it HERE!
This is an AWESOME flipbook. My free sign and notes offer a brief reminder to students about citizenship, but Christina’s flipbook is very detailed. I’m going to have my students keep a copy in their paper interactive notebooks. I really like that it has a place for students AND parents to sign. You can get a copy of it HERE.

What have you taught your students about digital citizenship? There's a lot of groundwork that needs to be laid before we can jump right into a 1:1 classroom. Teachers can't assume that students know about copyright laws and plagiarism, and they also can't assume that students have been taught how to use the Internet safely. This post will help you get your classroom ready for 1:1 technology integration by giving you tips for teaching these important concepts.
Get it HERE!
I have a Digital Citizenship Video Webquest, as well that encourages students to look into some important issues surrounding digital citizenship. The films are short and engaging and students are guided in responding thoughtfully to each one. You can get it HERE.

Will you teach Digital Citizenship when school starts? If so, how will you do it? Leave a comment below to let me know!
 


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Sunday, July 17, 2016

1:1 Ready: 3 Ways to Avoid Making Technology the New Book Work

It's easy to get caught up in the classroom technology bandwagon, but it may not be for the right reasons. In this post I share three ways to prevent your 1:1 classroom from turning into the old "book work" classroom. In short it's best to break up your technology use with other activities, employ the use of stations, and integrate some play with technology games from time to time. Cheers to your digital classroom!
Summer is a reflective time for me, and I'm guessing, it is for most teachers. I use the mini sabbatical to spend time with my family and recharge. But I also use it to plan for the next school year. That is a process that comes with a lot of reflection.

So far this summer, I have been preparing to go fully 1:1 with my classes. I began the process last year (as much as my access to technology would allow), so I've used the summer to reflect on what worked and what didn't. So far, in this series, I've blogged about two things that have served to make my life as a teacher so much easier--Google Forms for Multi-Media Assessment and making OUR lives easier and Screencastify for content delivery in absentia.
It's easy to get caught up in the classroom technology bandwagon, but it may not be for the right reasons. In this post I share three ways to prevent your 1:1 classroom from turning into the old "book work" classroom. In short it's best to break up your technology use with other activities, employ the use of stations, and integrate some play with technology games from time to time. Cheers to your digital classroom!
Technology has opened a wide world of possibilities in the classroom--virtual field trips, flipped classrooms, less paperwork for teachers, digital interactive notebooks (thank you Danielle Knight for teaching us how to do it--you can check out her brilliant toolkit HERE).

But as we move forward, I think it's important to do so mindfully. We should remember our
ultimate goals as educators of students and as purveyors of content. We are here to nurture young minds and to deliver content in the most effective ways possible. Just because students are using their devices doesn't mean that they are engaging in quality assignments.

Think about it this way--when textbooks were the thing, we didn't exclusively use them just because we had them. Most of us realized that teachers who did so week after week were phoning it in. Let's try to be the same way with our Chromebooks, IPads, or whatever devices we're using.

Planning is at the heart of the effective classroom. That's not going to change just because we go 1:1.

So, upon much summertime reflection, I've thought of...

3 Ways to Avoid Making Technology The New Book Work


It's easy to get caught up in the classroom technology bandwagon, but it may not be for the right reasons. In this post I share three ways to prevent your 1:1 classroom from turning into the old "book work" classroom. In short it's best to break up your technology use with other activities, employ the use of stations, and integrate some play with technology games from time to time. Cheers to your digital classroom!
We've all been there--I'm there now--sitting in front of a screen, typing away. That's good. We're focused when we do that. We're thoughtful (if we're not checking facebook, which I may or may not be currently doing). But we're also shutting other people out.

Technology is certainly not the only cause of that--book work certainly has the same effect.

But in the old days, it was considered bad practice to do nothing but book work for an entire course. So let's avoid doing that with computers and thinking that it's okay just because we're incorporating technology. Let's continue to vary our activities.

An example of how I might do this is when I'm introducing a new unit. I always begin with vocabulary. I have digital flashcards with film links and 10 to 11 pages of activities (cloze reading, matching, puzzles). I assign it all in Google Classroom. Last year I made the mistake of assigning it all at once. That made for a lot of screen-staring time (a.k.a.--a whole block of book work).

So I'm making an effort to break it all up. I can make copies of my big documents in Google Drive (as many as I want), and delete slides or pages so that I'm just assigning a little at a time. Students can create folders for each topic in their Drives so that they stay organized.

Here's an example of how I plan to do it this year (you can preview the entire vocabulary unit I'm using as an example HERE):

1. Assign the flashcards and matching activity before we begin the unit and instruct students to preview the cards, watch the films, and complete the matching activity at home, during lunch, before practice, in study hall--you get the idea.
2. The day we begin the unit, I'll only assign the cloze reading to the students. I'll set a timer for 10 or 15 minutes, and let them complete it and submit it to me.
3. Then we'll go over the answers together. There are all kinds of ways for me to know if they actually tried or just put down anything down, not the least of which is that I'll have their submitted answers. I also like to "cyber stalk" them while they're working. You can read about how to do that HERE.
4. Then we'll play QUIZ-QUIZ TRADE or QUIZLET LIVE.

It's easy to get caught up in the classroom technology bandwagon, but it may not be for the right reasons. In this post I share three ways to prevent your 1:1 classroom from turning into the old "book work" classroom. In short it's best to break up your technology use with other activities, employ the use of stations, and integrate some play with technology games from time to time. Cheers to your digital classroom!



It's easy to get caught up in the classroom technology bandwagon, but it may not be for the right reasons. In this post I share three ways to prevent your 1:1 classroom from turning into the old "book work" classroom. In short it's best to break up your technology use with other activities, employ the use of stations, and integrate some play with technology games from time to time. Cheers to your digital classroom!I've advocated a 3-3-3 Station Rotation Model in the past. I like it--it's simple. It enables flex-grouping and differentiation. It allows the teacher to give students more individual attention. You can find out more about the Station Rotation Model HERE.

I plan to use it as a way to avoid turning computers into book work substitutes. But--and this is important--only ONE of my stations will use technology. I know, I know, I know--that's not what I said last time, but now all of my students will have their own device. They need something different at each station--moving locations is part of it, and what's the point in moving if they can just access everything on their devices?

*A work around for this if, say, you want the task cards at station 2 to be digital, or you want to give virtual notes at one station and a virtual tour at the other, is to have a link or QR Code to the activity (the website--your screencastify on YouTube or linked to your Google Drive). If you have digital handouts for these, you can assign them in Classroom or via email, but they should have to move to get the link that goes with it.

Here's an example of what I might do:
Station 1: Technology Station, for example: virtual notes, virtual tours, digital interactive notebook activity
Station 2: No Technology (*or see suggestion above) for example: task cards, foldables, cartoons, puzzles
Station 3: Teacher Led--some type of remediation or enrichment
End of Class: Formative Assessment

It's easy to get caught up in the classroom technology bandwagon, but it may not be for the right reasons. In this post I share three ways to prevent your 1:1 classroom from turning into the old "book work" classroom. In short it's best to break up your technology use with other activities, employ the use of stations, and integrate some play with technology games from time to time. Cheers to your digital classroom!

It's easy to get caught up in the classroom technology bandwagon, but it may not be for the right reasons. In this post I share three ways to prevent your 1:1 classroom from turning into the old "book work" classroom. In short it's best to break up your technology use with other activities, employ the use of stations, and integrate some play with technology games from time to time. Cheers to your digital classroom!Games require thinking and interaction. They can help students review or learn material, but they also promote cooperation and collegial competition. In other words, they build social skills. When students are playing games with each other, even if the games are on the computer, they are not isolated.

They don't have to be lengthy games or take much prep. For games like this, I highly recommend becoming familiar with a few Kagan Structures. You can read about five to get started with HERE. They are quick, they break up your lessons, and they get students talking (hopefully about what you want them to :)).

I'm not a huge fan of whole class games because some of the students just don't participate. I prefer partner and small group games because they force everyone to participate (generally). Check out this video to see some that I made for Google Drive that are easy to assign in Classroom and can be played in small groups.

You can check out the games HERE.

How are you planning for effective instruction in a 1:1 Classroom? Leave a comment below to let me know!

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