Curious about making stations work in a blended classroom? What about turning in work? This post explores how you can have your students submit pen-and-paper work digitally, as well as how you can make stations work in a digital classroom.
I've been enjoying my digital classroom. I love using Google Classroom as an organizational tool for both my students and myself. But, as I mentioned LAST WEEK, I'm not ditching the paper interactive notebooks all together.

Sometimes, students need to color, fold, paste, and write. The digital classroom is highly differentiated, so I've been making more use of my stations than ever. And I like my stations. Students put together puzzles, they roll dice, they play games, they color....

It's like I said a few months ago in Education Week:
Curious about making stations work in a blended classroom? What about turning in work? This post explores how you can have your students submit pen-and-paper work digitally, as well as how you can make stations work in a digital classroom.
Read it HERE
So how do you blend the two worlds? How do you submit traditional assignments digitally?

First of all, I have been making interactive digital activities that are no prep for the teacher and highly engaging for the student. But what If I want my students to make this when we are discussing medieval manors in world history?
Curious about making stations work in a blended classroom? What about turning in work? This post explores how you can have your students submit pen-and-paper work digitally, as well as how you can make stations work in a digital classroom.
See it HERE
Curious about making stations work in a blended classroom? What about turning in work? This post explores how you can have your students submit pen-and-paper work digitally, as well as how you can make stations work in a digital classroom.
Curious about making stations work in a blended classroom? What about turning in work? This post explores how you can have your students submit pen-and-paper work digitally, as well as how you can make stations work in a digital classroom.Or this when it's time for a student to move on to stations?




My students get a lot out of card sorts, puzzles, and games, and I don't want to take that away from them.


So, here's a good solution for submitting paper activities digitally and a great idea for keeping track of physical stations digitally.

Submitting Paper Activities Digitally

If you're using Google Classroom, create an assignment that says (for example):
Curious about making stations work in a blended classroom? What about turning in work? This post explores how you can have your students submit pen-and-paper work digitally, as well as how you can make stations work in a digital classroom.


Curious about making stations work in a blended classroom? What about turning in work? This post explores how you can have your students submit pen-and-paper work digitally, as well as how you can make stations work in a digital classroom.
This is what it looks like--you can zoom in on the actual shot to read it.
When students open the assignment, they can click "Add," and take a picture of the assignment. Then they can hit, "turn in," and you will have a copy of each students' work in your digital classroom.

If you are using Google Drive or Microsoft OneDrive, have students create a document, insert the pictures, and send it to you.

Go ahead, carry your tiny, stylish purse home and nothing else. Kick back on the couch and grade with your tablet.

Stations in the Digital Classroom

I use digital activities for stations--don't get me wrong--I love them, the students love them, we all love them. But there are certain things that just don't translate as well digitally. I do a lot of vocabulary, geography, and literacy at my stations--card sorts, puzzles, task cards, oh, my. But think about this--so many of our students are lacking in a really basic skill--social.

I think that games are a great way to build those. Not everyday. Some days, I say, "No game stations." 

Or, "You can only do a vocabulary station today if you finish early."

But once or twice a week, a game station just because is a great way for them to interact face-to-face with each other (if they have finished their work).

I have them create a document in their Drives titled, "Stations Extra Credit." Every time they complete an activity (worksheet, task card, card sort, puzzle...), they take a picture of it and insert it into the document. I assign a specific point value to each activity. At the end of the term, they submit the document to me in Classroom (they can also do this through Google Drive or OneDrive). BAM! EXTRA CREDIT! They love that.
Curious about making stations work in a blended classroom? What about turning in work? This post explores how you can have your students submit pen-and-paper work digitally, as well as how you can make stations work in a digital classroom.

I'm loving the blended classroom so far. Moderation in all things. You don't need to be dogmatic on either side--there truly is a middle ground--finding it is a good feeling.

Have you started your digital journey? For better or for worse, we all have to in the near future. Let me know how you're making it "better" in the comments below.

Stick Around!

Google Classroom Troubleshooting for Beginners
Read it!
Google Classroom: Why and How
Read it!
Blending My Classes One Unit at a Time
Read it!














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I haven't always had a blended classroom. When my principal decided he wanted us teachers to transition to blended learning, I had to figure out how I was going to set up that process. In this post I explain how I prepared one unit for blended learning, both digital practice and direct instruction.A blended classroom is when a teacher combines digital learning with face to face instruction. I was reticent to do this at first because I have these complete interactive notebook units that are completely paper-based, and I've had a lot of success with them. If it ain't broke, don't fix it--right?

My school system is going 1:1 this next school year. I was more than a little wary about it, but boss-man said "go," so I knew I had no choice but to get on board. My students want to be on their devices, after all--it's second nature to them, and it's been working really well so far. That said, however, I am not taking my classes completely digital. Face-to-face time will always be important, and direct instruction is sometimes necessary.

Blending my classes has shaken things up, though. In a good way. A very good way.

Getting Started with Unit 1

I teach several subjects, but world history is my wheelhouse, so I'm going to use Unit 1: Ancient Civilizations as an example.

I set up my interactive notebooks with a main section, full of handouts that apply to the entire course, and then I separate each of the following sections by unit.The left side of each page is content. The right side is student interaction with that content.

I began blending by looking at my table of contents and taking notes.
I haven't always had a blended classroom. When my principal decided he wanted us teachers to transition to blended learning, I had to figure out how I was going to set up that process. In this post I explain how I prepared one unit for blended learning, both digital practice and direct instruction.
THIS...

I haven't always had a blended classroom. When my principal decided he wanted us teachers to transition to blended learning, I had to figure out how I was going to set up that process. In this post I explain how I prepared one unit for blended learning, both digital practice and direct instruction.
BECAME THIS
A couple of weeks ago I wrote about how I was creating interactive digital activities with the guidance of Danielle Knight who has some AMAZING ideas. You can read about it here If you plan to create them, her toolkit is beyond helpful. If you're looking for some ready to go, no prep, digital resources, you can preview mine here.

I'm working on blended-learning add-ons as supplements for each of my world history interactive notebooks, but for now, I've got a world history growing digital classroom bundle that is a huge money saver right now (as you'll get all future additions for free). It goes well with my paper interactive notebooks.

World History Interactive Google Classroom Activities
Preview it HERE
World History Interactive Notebook Bundle
Preview it HERE

I'm still creating PDFs, but I have to say, blending my classroom has benefited both me and my students. It makes my job a lot easier, and it puts the responsibility of content learning where it belongs--on the students.

When I began unit 1, the first thing I assigned the students was their digital vocabulary work. They really seemed to enjoy it, but I knew it was effective by two forms of evidence.

1. When I gave them the first direct lecture over Egypt, they already knew the words and were able to use them in dicussion.
2, The scores on their Google Forms (self-grading) Quiz were impressive. See the vocabulary activities HERE.

Thanks for stopping by, and don't forget to come back next Monday to see how I implement stations and have students submit pen and paper assignments digitally in Google Classroom.

How do you blend your classroom in the 1:1 age? Leave a comment below to let me know!


And don't forget to check out these digital classroom posts--both have printable cheat sheets:
Google Classroom: Why and How?
Read it HERE
Google Classroom Troubleshooting for Beginners
Read it HERE

Thanks to Danielle Knight, RebeccaB Designs, Glitter Meets Glue Designs, KG Fonts, and Jewel Pastor for their wonderful creativity!

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Are you implementing Google Classroom but running into technical difficulties? I've got a ton of troubleshooting tips in this blog post, and I've even put them all into a PDF that you can download and save to your computer for easy future reference. Google Classroom has been a game-changer for my classroom, and I want it to be one for you, too!
Week one of using Google Classroom has come to a close for me, and it's been the biggest game-changer already (for me) since interactive notebooks. Case in point--I have a lot to grade this weekend, but I brought home zero papers. This is what grading looks like now:
Are you implementing Google Classroom but running into technical difficulties? I've got a ton of troubleshooting tips in this blog post, and I've even put them all into a PDF that you can download and save to your computer for easy future reference. Google Classroom has been a game-changer for my classroom, and I want it to be one for you, too!

Earlier today, I was lounging on the couch, watching Netflix, and grading with my tablet, WOW.

So I'm sold on this Google Classroom thing, but it's not just me. My students love it, too. Here's a response to an exit ticket I got last Wednesday. (Oh, a digital exit ticket. I have a package of 20 you can get HERE.):
Are you implementing Google Classroom but running into technical difficulties? I've got a ton of troubleshooting tips in this blog post, and I've even put them all into a PDF that you can download and save to your computer for easy future reference. Google Classroom has been a game-changer for my classroom, and I want it to be one for you, too!
I'm not quite sure how "being flashcards" will help us learn, but I'm really glad about the positive response I'm getting from the students.

 I truly am a facilitator with this set up. My class is so quiet it's a little unsettling while the students are working, and then there's a burst of noise, and I realize they've come to a pair-share or short discussion point. Quiet again. Then talking as they begin group work. The activities allow them to guide themselves.

And their discussions are good--relevant. I am free to work with students one-on-one or in small groups. I feel relaxed. I almost feel like I'm cheating. Isn't our job supposed to be a struggle? Aren't we supposed to be exhausted at the end of the day?

But we have run into issues, mostly from being completely new to the whole platform. The problems we've encountered were all easy fixes, and I've listed them for you here (and included a PDF for you to print and reference) in case you're just as new to Google Classroom as I am. Hopefully, this helps if you encounter any of these issues on your Google Classroom adventure.

  My students can’t edit the documents I’ve assigned them
Are you implementing Google Classroom but running into technical difficulties? I've got a ton of troubleshooting tips in this blog post, and I've even put them all into a PDF that you can download and save to your computer for easy future reference. Google Classroom has been a game-changer for my classroom, and I want it to be one for you, too!
After you attach the document from drive, select “make a copy for each student.”










I’m editing an assignment, and I can’t find the “make a copy for each student option.”


Are you implementing Google Classroom but running into technical difficulties? I've got a ton of troubleshooting tips in this blog post, and I've even put them all into a PDF that you can download and save to your computer for easy future reference. Google Classroom has been a game-changer for my classroom, and I want it to be one for you, too!
You can’t “make a copy” for each student in edit mode. You’ll have to delete the assignment and start over—sorry.












My students can’t edit slides on their mobile devices.


Are you implementing Google Classroom but running into technical difficulties? I've got a ton of troubleshooting tips in this blog post, and I've even put them all into a PDF that you can download and save to your computer for easy future reference. Google Classroom has been a game-changer for my classroom, and I want it to be one for you, too!
They need to download the free Google Slides App.



 I can’t get a test or quiz in google forms to attach from drive.


Are you implementing Google Classroom but running into technical difficulties? I've got a ton of troubleshooting tips in this blog post, and I've even put them all into a PDF that you can download and save to your computer for easy future reference. Google Classroom has been a game-changer for my classroom, and I want it to be one for you, too!
You can’t attach a Google Form. You have to add the link.




 I want a particular assignment to show up first in the stream.


Are you implementing Google Classroom but running into technical difficulties? I've got a ton of troubleshooting tips in this blog post, and I've even put them all into a PDF that you can download and save to your computer for easy future reference. Google Classroom has been a game-changer for my classroom, and I want it to be one for you, too!
There is a “move to top” option.






 Students have turned in an assignment that they still need to work on.

Are you implementing Google Classroom but running into technical difficulties? I've got a ton of troubleshooting tips in this blog post, and I've even put them all into a PDF that you can download and save to your computer for easy future reference. Google Classroom has been a game-changer for my classroom, and I want it to be one for you, too!
Send them a message to “unsubmit” the assignment and instruct them to complete or redo it.
If it’s past the due date, simply change the due date temporarily.

  I teach multiple sections of the same subject, and I want to use the same assignment for all of them, but I don't want to retype it all those times.


Are you implementing Google Classroom but running into technical difficulties? I've got a ton of troubleshooting tips in this blog post, and I've even put them all into a PDF that you can download and save to your computer for easy future reference. Google Classroom has been a game-changer for my classroom, and I want it to be one for you, too!
There is an option to post the same assignment to multiple classes.
If you forget, there is a “reuse post” option.

 I can’t get back to all of my classes when I am viewing a particular class. Seriously. This confused me at first.

Are you implementing Google Classroom but running into technical difficulties? I've got a ton of troubleshooting tips in this blog post, and I've even put them all into a PDF that you can download and save to your computer for easy future reference. Google Classroom has been a game-changer for my classroom, and I want it to be one for you, too!

Click on the three lines next to your class title and drop down options will appear. You can go to any of your classes from there or back to home.

A student accidentally deletes the slides or doc I’ve assigned her.

Are you implementing Google Classroom but running into technical difficulties? I've got a ton of troubleshooting tips in this blog post, and I've even put them all into a PDF that you can download and save to your computer for easy future reference. Google Classroom has been a game-changer for my classroom, and I want it to be one for you, too!

-Go into your drive, and make a copy of the original assignment (important to make a copy—you don’t want the student editing your original).
-Click “share” on the copy, and select “user can edit."
Email your student the link.
-When she completes the assignment, instruct her to go back to the assignment box in classroom and click “add,” and attach the document from drive before submitting.

My students can’t figure out how to attach documents and photos when submitting assignments.

Are you implementing Google Classroom but running into technical difficulties? I've got a ton of troubleshooting tips in this blog post, and I've even put them all into a PDF that you can download and save to your computer for easy future reference. Google Classroom has been a game-changer for my classroom, and I want it to be one for you, too!

Before they “turn in” the assignment, they should click “Add.” They will be prompted to add a file from their computer or Google Drive or to add a link.
Those are the only issues I've run into so far here at the beginning of my digital classroom journey. You can check out my interactive resources for Google Classroom HERE. They've been a big hit with my kids so far!

Do you use Google Classroom? If so, what are some issues you've encountered, and how have you fixed them? Let me know HERE or in the comments!

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