QR codes are a really fun and surprisingly easy tool to use in the classroom. Click through to read my post about how you can review for exams with a QR code scavenger hunt.
As a huge proponent of the blended classroom, I like to mix things up. Last week, I wrote about super-quick low-tech reviews. This week, the exam review in my classroom is all about that tech.

Just like the next person, I have my favorites that I tend to overuse, and I've written about them on several occasions (QuizletLive, Kahoot!, edpuzzle, learning apps, Google Apps, etc.). But when you hear the Kahoot! music coming from the room across the hall and your students are mindlessly singing along, that might be a sign that it's time to throw something new their way.

And when you have students who get fidgety after 10 minutes in their seats, it's imperative to try something new.

So this week, I'm going to write about one really cool and simple tech review that will get your students out of their seats and engaged. This one is truly blended, folks.

Have a QR Challenge Scavenger Hunt

QR codes are a really fun and surprisingly easy tool to use in the classroom. Click through to read my post about how you can review for exams with a QR code scavenger hunt.I try to get students up and moving whenever I can. It's great for kinesthetic learners and, truly, it's good to throw a curve ball at everybody every now and then. Simply visit QR Code Treasure Hunt from classtools.net (there's lots of fun stuff here). You will enter questions and answers that you want your students to review.

Only instead of printing out a boring worksheet, this site generates QR Codes for you--they don't lead to a website--they pull up the text of the question. So, you can print the QR Codes, scatter them around your room or the school, and challenge students to find them, scan them, and answer them in a set amount of time.

I know, I know, QR Codes are so 2015, but you have simply got to give this one a try. Students are racing to answer questions--finding that QR Code and scanning it adds that treasure hunt element that makes it fun.

I'm going to show you how to create one of these scavenger hunts, how to implement one in your classroom, and, finally, how to trouble shoot potential issues (do not skip this part--the new IPhone update can cause a potential issue if you don't prepare).

Here's How You Do It:

QR codes are a really fun and surprisingly easy tool to use in the classroom. Click through to read my post about how you can review for exams with a QR code scavenger hunt.


QR codes are a really fun and surprisingly easy tool to use in the classroom. Click through to read my post about how you can review for exams with a QR code scavenger hunt.

Be sure to download the Cheat Sheet so that you can do this with your students. :)

What do you think? This is the boring study guide that's not so boring--a wonderful mix of technology, movement, and challenge. If you give it a try, be sure to let me know how it goes in the comments below. And check back in next week--I plan to discuss one more exam review that has been a life-saver for my exhausted students.

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Email Format

If you're a secondary teacher, then you know exams are not so fun. However, these three review games for exams can be done in 15 minutes or less! Click through to read how to review for exams with these activities.
It's that time of year. The time of year that is met with dread by students and teachers alike. The time of year that, in the winter, we need two weeks to recover from, and in the spring, at least eight.

It's Exam Time. Again.

Exams give me a queasy feeling in the pit of my stomach that can only be induced by--exams.

The source of the uneasiness? Perhaps it's the echo of the test anxiety I felt as a student reverberating through my mind's locker. Perhaps it's the undue amount of emphasis we place on tests, or the undue amount of weight we give to test results in teacher evaluations (but I've written about that stressor elsewhere).

Whatever the cause of this anxiety, I know exams are right around the corner. I know I have to get to a certain point in the curriculum by then. I know students need to review. And I know we don't have the amount of time to review that we need.

If you're a secondary teacher, then you know exams are not so fun. However, these three review games for exams can be done in 15 minutes or less! Click through to read how to review for exams with these activities.So my mission this week is to talk about quick and easy review strategies that will take no more than 15 minutes either at the beginning or the end of class, so that we can review and continue to learn new material right until the bitter end.

1. 5-5-5 Study Guide

Never heard of it before? Well, okay--I made it up, but it works with my students, so I'm thinking it might work with yours, too.

You know those study guides that we would have killed for when we were in school? The ones our teachers never made? The ones our students never answer?

Yes, those.

Go ahead and devote 15 minutes at the end of class to forcing students to examine this gift horse full on. It goes like this:

-Instruct students that they have five minutes to work on their study guide all alone and quietly. They should go through it and answer all of the questions they can off the top of their heads. Then they should look up questions they don't know the answers to using their notes. Set your timer for five minutes.

-When the timer goes off, pair students with the person next to them. Explain to them that they will have five minutes to discuss answers and help each other out. Set your timer for five minutes.

-When the timer goes off, tell students that they have five minutes to ask you questions. The time limit ensures that the majority of them pay attention to questions asked and answered and that you aren't answering study guide questions repeatedly and indefinitely. Set your timer for five minutes.

2. Study Guide Scrammble


If you're a secondary teacher, then you know exams are not so fun. However, these three review games for exams can be done in 15 minutes or less! Click through to read how to review for exams with these activities.

Answer the study guide yourself, and then delete the questions, and mix up the answers. Place students into groups of three or four. Instruct them to place the number of the question on their study guide next to the answer it best goes with.

I make this quick by turning it into a challenge. The first group that gets all of the answers correct, wins. I give them XP (points for my gamified classroom), but candy and extra credit are also great incentives.

To make checking their answers go as quickly as possible, be sure to make a key with the study guide question numbers next to the answers.

3. Face the Class

This is another one I made up, but with the help of tried and true games like TABOO and the once popular app, HEADS UP.

For a 15 minute Review:
-Type one vocabulary, concept, person, etc. word onto a single PowerPoint slide. Fill up as many slides with one word as you plan to review.
-Divide your class into two teams.
-Have one student stand in front of the class with his/her back to the board.
-Students from his/her team give clues without saying the actual word that is projected.
-If the student guesses the word correctly before the timer sounds (set a timer for one minute), his/her team gets a point.
-The team with the most points at the end of the game wins (XP, a piece of candy, extra credit...).

If I ever have a few minutes left at the end of class, I call one student up to "Face the Class." The entire class gives clues without saying the word. If the student guesses the correct answer before the timer goes off, he/she gets a piece of candy and selects the next student to "Face the Class."

I used this method once before when I was being observed and had 5 minutes left with nothing to do, and the administrator was quite impressed!

I made a PowerPoint game template of this with a built in timer and a scoreboard that you can type on in present mode. You can preview it HERE.


If you're a secondary teacher, then you know exams are not so fun. However, these three review games for exams can be done in 15 minutes or less! Click through to read how to review for exams with these activities.
Get it HERE!

What are your quick, go-to reviews that take 15 minutes or less? Leave a comment and let me know.

And check back in next week when I talk about the three best super quick reviews using technology--perfect for the 1:1 classroom!



Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Email Format

There are a lot of events happening in the world today that give people cause to complain. However, what's more productive is to offer solutions with those complaints. In this blog post, I talk about how to teach students to engage in civil discourse as a means of resolving conflict and finding real-world solutions. Click through to read the whole post and download a free lesson!
What is talking about a problem without offering possible solutions? Complaining.

Sometimes, it's okay to complain. It can be cathartic, and it's okay to talk through our disappointments, but if complaining is all we are in the habit of doing when faced with a problem, then nothing ever gets solved.

I've been hearing a lot of complaining lately about riots, violence, terrorism, natural disasters--all things we should be complaining about.

But my contention is that we need to guide our students to kick complaining up a notch and learn to offer solutions for their complaints. This is called problem-solving, a vital skill that can help transform feelings of helplessness into something more productive. I have a free lesson below for you that I'd really like your help with. What would you add, keep, and how did it work in your classroom? We had AMAZING discussions in my class, but that's a small piece of the puzzle.

In order to become adept problem-solvers, our students need to be willing to listen to opinions that conflict with their own. But this seems to be very difficult for everyone, adults and young people alike.

There are a lot of events happening in the world today that give people cause to complain. However, what's more productive is to offer solutions with those complaints. In this blog post, I talk about how to teach students to engage in civil discourse as a means of resolving conflict and finding real-world solutions. Click through to read the whole post and download a free lesson!The students of today have come of age along with social media. Social media offers us a chance to be heard and to connect with others on a scale unimagined by previous generations. Social media has rendered C. Wright Mills's "Power Elite" virtually obsolete (the government officials and corporations who had the loudest voice in the past).

Revolutions have begun as a result of social media--think the Arab Spring (withholding comments about its outcome). Citizen reporting has become a thing because of social media--think Periscope and Facebook Live.

But there is a dark side to social media--a tendency to be exposed only to opinions that perpetuate our own. We don't get the whole picture that way. We begin to see individuals as the sum of their views. That is, if somebody holds an opinion contrary to our own, they are the "other"--untrustworthy, evil.

It's no mistake that this has happened. It's not a vast Orwellian conspiracy leading us all down these blissfully narrow paths. It's simple economics.

Social media outlets are not charitable organizations, but corporations whose primary concern is the bottom line. That bottom line is met through advertisements. Advertisements are targeted at social media users. If we don't visit their platforms, advertisers stop giving them business. If advertisers stop giving them business, they lose money (the new power elite?).

So, in order for any social media outlet to make money, we have to keep coming back to see their ads. We are more likely to return if what we see reinforces our existing views. They know what our existing views are because of our posts, likes, shares, and those very un-delicious browser cookies. Therefore, they have developed algorithms to ensure that our existing opinions pop out at us the most when we visit their sites.

Whenever conflicting opinions pop up, they have typically already been harangued and vilified by others of our mindset. And so confirmation bias sets in. And so we keep going back to Facebook, Twitter, Snap Chat, Instagram, whatever.

That is great for social media corporations, but disasterous for our democratic-republic.

Students need to be aware of this issue. They need to understand that conflict is a vital part of life--it introduces us to new perspectives. It allows us to grow. If we shield ourselves from conflict, we are also shielding ourselves from knowledge, from relationships, and from citizenship.

Opening ourselves up to conflict is important but so is our response to it. We must truly listen to opposing sides. Then we must counter (if we choose to do so) with logic, reason, and civility. Vitriol doesn't change minds, it leads to defensiveness.

Do I advocate moral relativism? Not remotely. Do I advocate standing up for your beliefs in the face of obvious injustice? Absolutely.

There are a lot of events happening in the world today that give people cause to complain. However, what's more productive is to offer solutions with those complaints. In this blog post, I talk about how to teach students to engage in civil discourse as a means of resolving conflict and finding real-world solutions. Click through to read the whole post and download a free lesson!
GET THE LESSON
But there is a civil way to do it. A way that employs logic rather than name-calling. A way that acknowledges the dignity we all possess as humans and is founded on the principle that we are more than our political views.

The lesson I use to introduce these ideas is simple. It takes two traditional periods or one block class. I used it as a unit challenge for my gamified classroom, but it makes a good mini lesson for any social studies or ELA class (change the unit topics to ones from, say, a novel).

You can grab an example of it HERE (feel free to customize for your classroom), but it basically goes like this:

***NEVER show film clips without previewing them first to make sure they are appropriate for your class.***

Day 1:
1. Bellringer: What rights are we guaranteed under the First Amendment? Explain which right you
believe is the most important.
-Discuss, and then project THIS summary of the First Amendment on the board. Show Clip 1 and Clip 2. Discuss whether or not either of those instances are examples of an expression of or a violation of the First Amendment.

2. Read the handout as a class and go over the rubric. Make sure the students understand that there is no right or wrong answer here. They are problem-solving and being creative. So that they feel free to explore, I don't make this a major grade, nor is there a product attached to it. They are simply discussing, writing their thoughts in an organized fashion on notebook paper, and then sharing with the class.
There are a lot of events happening in the world today that give people cause to complain. However, what's more productive is to offer solutions with those complaints. In this blog post, I talk about how to teach students to engage in civil discourse as a means of resolving conflict and finding real-world solutions. Click through to read the whole post and download a free lesson!
GET THE LESSON

Day 2:
1. Bellringer: What is the biggest problem facing our society? Explain why you think so.
-Discuss, and then listen to THIS interview. After it's over, ask students what they thought about it, what stood out to them the most, and how it's an example of bravery and civil conflict in action.
2. Give each group a few minutes to share and discuss their answers from the previous day with the class.
3. Closing: Have students complete the exit ticket about civil conflict and problem-solving.

This isn't a glitzy lesson--there are no bells and whistles. But it is a lesson that asks students to think about problems, offer solutions, and to also consider that individuals are more than their political opinions.

What do you think? How do you get your students to problem-solve, interact, and express compassion? Please let me know in the comments below--I'd love some new ideas!

For my fourth post in my Summer Professional Development series, I'm talking about using gamification for classroom management. You might be wondering why I'm advocating games for behavior control, but that's not quite it. Click through to read how we can adapt gamification to the classroom.



What is Gamifying?

 
Gamifying is fun. It’s incentivising. It’s a classroom management strategy. Gamifying is the way many apps, programs, and even businesses are starting to work. 
For my fourth post in my Summer Professional Development series, I'm talking about using gamification for classroom management. You might be wondering why I'm advocating games for behavior control, but that's not quite it. Click through to read how we can adapt gamification to the classroom.

Gamifying is not simply playing games in your classroom.


In short, gamifying is incentivizing desired behavior with points, levels, and rewards. Let’s say you teach a math class, and you want your students to bring their notebooks and pencils (or 1:1 devices) every day. Give them a point for doing that.


These points don’t go into the gradebook, though. They’re part of the larger game around which you have structured your classroom. After a certain number of points, students will move up a level, or “level-up.” Each level holds with it a desired privilege. That privilege can be a simple reward or “skill” that the student now possesses. Each level is associated with a badge.


This is how video games work. It’s how various apps that incentivize weight-loss and healthy lifestyles work (think about the badges you earn on your Fitbit). This is the way many offices work, as well, so it’s no wonder that classrooms are headed in the same direction.


Why Gamify?

I’ve been in the classroom for 15 plus years, and I believe I have a pretty good grasp on the management side. I’m good at developing a rapport with my students and at making my lessons engaging (I hope). What’s more, I’m not a very organized person, nor am I a gamer.


So why does gamification make sense for me?


Gamification is the direction the world is heading for a very simple reason--because it works. It works because it combines the right amount of collaboration with competition. It recognizes progress over grades, effort over results. It makes it okay to try and fail because badges, rewards, and recognition come from the effort--the process. We don’t always have to be perfect in a gamified classroom.


I hate exercising, but I know I should do it because it’s good for me. But that knowledge had not been enough to get me to do it in the past. When I bought a Fitbit, I could see tangible results for the progress I had made. I would earn badges for taking extra steps. Seeing the steps my friends had taken on a given day encouraged me to take more. I’m cheering for them, but I’m also competing with them. I may not see immediate physical results from taking 10,000 steps in a day, but I will see fireworks on my Fitbit.


Those fireworks give me an immediate sense of accomplishment, and I want to keep on because that makes me feel good. Accomplishing goals, solving problems, working with others, and being recognized releases the dopamine that encourages me to keep going--even when I don’t necessarily feel like it.


Transferring this idea to your classroom can make your students feel the same way.

It might seem overwhelming at first, but it's definitely worth it in the long run. Below I've listed resources that will help you get started gamifying today.

Resources for Learning More about Gamification


For my fourth post in my Summer Professional Development series, I'm talking about using gamification for classroom management. You might be wondering why I'm advocating games for behavior control, but that's not quite it. Click through to read how we can adapt gamification to the classroom.
Get it HERE!
This is my simple method, complete with instructional video, organizational spread sheet, note and planning sheets, editable classroom templates, and example. You can use classroom technology...or not.

This video explains why gamification is the wave of the future in the classroom, office, and beyond.

This article provides specific ideas for gamifying your classroom.

Here are examples of gamification in the classroom.

Classcraft is a great tool for gamifying--especially in middle school. Most teachers I've spoken with find it a bit complicated but like it once they learn how to use it.

Remember...

For my fourth post in my Summer Professional Development series, I'm talking about using gamification for classroom management. You might be wondering why I'm advocating games for behavior control, but that's not quite it. Click through to read how we can adapt gamification to the classroom.We need to model for our students that true learning doesn't just happen. It takes hard work, it takes starts and stops, it takes failure....

Success doesn't come from playing it safe, but standardized tests and grades in school reinforce in our students that it does.

It's time to turn that notion on its head.

Since I don't tie gamification in my classroom to grades, it helps students do just that: Take risks. Fail. Try again. Be creative.

Students earn experience points (XP) by coming to class prepared, being on time, completing creative extension assignments, problem-solving, coming in for extra help, retaking tests and quizzes, and so on.

Gamification naturally fosters a growth mindset.

So don't be afraid to try gamification. It won't be perfect at first, but that is how we learn.

Do you gamify? How do you implement it? Leave a comment below and let me know!






 
As part of my Summer Professional Development series, I've got the third post for you, which is all about how to turn your vacation into a lesson. Learn how to use a choice board to help students use technology to get to know one another and share about their summer vacations. Click through to get the full tutorial!
This is the third post in my summer professional development series. So far, I've written about Infusing Tech One Lesson at a Time and Easy Tools to Techify Your Classroom.

This week, I want to consider how to turn summer vacation into a back to school lesson. But not just any back to school lesson--one that serves a dual purpose:

1. Allowing the students to get to know you and one another
2. Introducing technology tools that the students will be using all year long.

First, I have written about the back to school activity I have created. Then, I have offered a short guide for you to use in creating your own.

How I Turned My Vacation into a Lesson

One of the questions I challenged myself to consider this summer was, "How will I give an overview of some of the tech we'll be using this year without putting the kids to sleep?" And also without wasting a ton of time, which we never seem to have enough of.

An idea came to me when I was looking over some of the "getting to know you" activities that I've used in the past to help foster an environment of collaboration. Why not combine the two? Why not integrate the tech introduction into a "getting to know you" activity?
As part of my Summer Professional Development series, I've got the third post for you, which is all about how to turn your vacation into a lesson. Learn how to use a choice board to help students use technology to get to know one another and share about their summer vacations. Click through to get the full tutorial!
I teach a diverse set of students, so thinking of something that will apply to them all is no simple task.

I started by considering common ground that all students will have at the beginning of the year.
And I thought of one thing--they are all returning from summer vacation.

Summer vacation means different things to different students. For some, it will mean trips to Europe. For others, it will mean forty hours behind a cash register. Sadly, for still others, it will mean having to worry about where their next meal will come from.

But they are all returning from summer break.

So I centered this lesson around that theme. And because our students are so diverse, I centered it around choice. The assignment looks roughly like this:

-A choice board with nine tasks. Students select one task from each row to complete.
-Each task requires using a technology tool to complete.
-Each tool is demonstrated through a video tutorial.
-Students bring the tasks together into a Google Slides Presentation (so they can familiarize themselves with that particular tool).
-They share the presentation in Google Classroom.
-Students review one another's presentations and use them to complete a scavenger hunt.
If students took pictures over the break (which many of them will have), one of the video tutorials teaches them how to embed those pictures into Flippity Flash Cards and how to create those flash cards. 

If they watched a movie or read a book, one of the tasks shows them how to open a doc, write a short report on it, and then transform the report into a word cloud image.

One of the tasks introduces web research tools by requiring them to briefly research one of three topics about summer and use those web tools to organize their research and create a bibliography.

I feel like this is a solid back to school activity that accomplishes both goals of establishing a collaborative environment through getting to know one another and of introducing some of the tech tools students will be using all year long and allowing students to become familiar with it.

I've made the activity available, complete with video tutorials, examples, choice board, rubric, scavenger hunt, and customizable templates for your classroom. You can get it HERE.

If you want to start from scratch and make your own to perfectly fit your classroom needs, here's what you'll need to consider.

Making Your Own Tech Infused Back to School Activity

Start by considering your objectives. What do you hope to accomplish? Then think about add-ons, apps, extensions, and other tools that you plan on using throughout the course. What would it most benefit your students to understand right away? I've described a few useful ones HERE.

Consider making short video tutorials of each tool so that the activity is self-guided for the students and you don't find yourself answering the same questions repeatedly. You can link to the tutorials right in the project. Then you can add the tutorials to the "About" section of Google Classroom, or whatever classroom app you are using, so that students can refer to them throughout the course as the need arises.

An easy and free way to make the tutorials is with Screencastify, a free Google Extension. I have a tutorial for using it HERE.

Then consider the task or tasks you want the students to complete. Do you want the tasks to culminate into a final product or do you just want to leave it as a series of activities or even one activity that requires a few tech tools? How do you want the students to share their creations with the class. Will they present? Will they post them in Classroom? Will they create QR codes?

Consider Back to School Activities you have done in the past. Consider how they can be re-purposed with technology.
Will you score the activities? What will your guidelines be?

Be sure to download this planning sheet complete with useful links to help you get started on turning your vacation into a lesson.

And don't forget to check back next week to consider the brain benefits of gamifying. 

How will you be handling back to school activities in the blended classroom? Will you "kill two birds with one stone" and use them to introduce technology tools? Leave a comment below and let me know!





Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Email Format

I've got some really great, easy tools to recommend in this post that will help you techify your classroom next school year! I'm sharing with you two apps, two add-ons, and two extensions that you can use. This post is part of my Summer Professional Development series, so click through to read about these tech tools and keep up with the rest of the series!
I am busy this summer working to improve my classroom game for the coming school year (and to catch up on Netflix). I'm sharing the former here in my summer professional development series.

Last week, I wrote about Infusing Tech One Lesson at a Time. This week, I want to share some simple tools that will help techify your class.

I've got some really great, easy tools to recommend in this post that will help you techify your classroom next school year! I'm sharing with you two apps, two add-ons, and two extensions that you can use. This post is part of my Summer Professional Development series, so click through to read about these tech tools and keep up with the rest of the series!
There is so much out there, and I discussed some in my Spring Tech Tips series. Today, I want to look at a few Google apps, add-ons, and extensions that can techify your classroom while improving your own and your students' productivity.

To offer a quick run-down, apps are basically self-updating programs or websites that are the next generation CDRom (remember those?). Add-ons are tools you can get to add features to Google Docs. Extensions improve the functionality of your web browser. You can grab these tools by visiting the Chrome Web Store.

There are so many apps, add-ons, and extensions out there that it's difficult to know where to begin, so I thought I would just pick my two favorite in each category and explain why they're so fantastic.

Techify Your Class with Apps

The web's the limit here--literally. But two apps that I want to discuss today are Mind Mup and Gooru.

Mind Mup allows your students to create mind maps--visual content organizers--digitally and then publish them to the web or share them with you.
I've got some really great, easy tools to recommend in this post that will help you techify your classroom next school year! I'm sharing with you two apps, two add-ons, and two extensions that you can use. This post is part of my Summer Professional Development series, so click through to read about these tech tools and keep up with the rest of the series!

Teachers curate the content of the web into lessons in Gooru. Gooru allows you to create classes and give your students codes to join or to share lessons via links. Search Gooru for a topic that you're teaching and units other teachers have created will pop up.

The units will include lessons comprised of readings, videos, images, interactive activities, and/or questions. The questions can be formatted several different ways (including multiple choice and free response) and are great to use as formative assessment.
I've got some really great, easy tools to recommend in this post that will help you techify your classroom next school year! I'm sharing with you two apps, two add-ons, and two extensions that you can use. This post is part of my Summer Professional Development series, so click through to read about these tech tools and keep up with the rest of the series!

I've got some really great, easy tools to recommend in this post that will help you techify your classroom next school year! I'm sharing with you two apps, two add-ons, and two extensions that you can use. This post is part of my Summer Professional Development series, so click through to read about these tech tools and keep up with the rest of the series!

Techify Your Class with Add-Ons

Every time I'm working in Docs, Forms, or Sheets, I always think, "I wish there were an add-on that would allow me to do such and such." Then I go to add-ons in the tool bar at the top, do a quick search, and there generally is.

It's difficult to narrow add-ons down to just two, but I would have to say that my favorite for Sheets is Flippity and my favorite for Docs is Easy Bib.

I would cry bitter tears if Flippity ever disappeared. It's a series of templates designed for non-coding geniuses like me to use in Sheets. With Flippity, you can create flash cards with images and film embedded, quiz games, crossword puzzles, bingo, spinners, progress trackers, and much more.

All you do is fill in the template provided with your content, go to file and select "publish to the web," go back to Add-ons, select "Flippity.net," click on the link, and you will be directed to an awesome, interactive activity that you just created on a humble spreadsheet.
I've got some really great, easy tools to recommend in this post that will help you techify your classroom next school year! I'm sharing with you two apps, two add-ons, and two extensions that you can use. This post is part of my Summer Professional Development series, so click through to read about these tech tools and keep up with the rest of the series!

I've got some really great, easy tools to recommend in this post that will help you techify your classroom next school year! I'm sharing with you two apps, two add-ons, and two extensions that you can use. This post is part of my Summer Professional Development series, so click through to read about these tech tools and keep up with the rest of the series!

I've got some really great, easy tools to recommend in this post that will help you techify your classroom next school year! I'm sharing with you two apps, two add-ons, and two extensions that you can use. This post is part of my Summer Professional Development series, so click through to read about these tech tools and keep up with the rest of the series!
The bane of my existence in grad school was bibliographies (and my students never seem to get them right now). I hated lugging around the MLA or APA handbook and checking and double checking that I got the formatting and punctuation just right. Easy Bib now takes care of that headache for us.

While typing a paper in Docs, students simply open the add-on. Easy Bib comes up in the right hand pane. Students enter the website URL, book ISBN, or Title, etc. Easy Bib formats, alphabetizes, generates, and inserts your bibliography straight into your Doc.
I've got some really great, easy tools to recommend in this post that will help you techify your classroom next school year! I'm sharing with you two apps, two add-ons, and two extensions that you can use. This post is part of my Summer Professional Development series, so click through to read about these tech tools and keep up with the rest of the series!

Techify Your Class with Extensions

Extensions can increase your and your students' productivity. I have chosen to feature two that are perfect for conducting research--Liner and Sprint Reader.

Liner enables you to highlight important text in web articles. It then saves the articles and highlights to your account. I love it because you can then organize the articles into folders by topic. When you go to create your Easy Bib, just open up your Liner Account, and grab the links from there.
I've got some really great, easy tools to recommend in this post that will help you techify your classroom next school year! I'm sharing with you two apps, two add-ons, and two extensions that you can use. This post is part of my Summer Professional Development series, so click through to read about these tech tools and keep up with the rest of the series!

Sprint Reader is a speed-reading extension. It forces you to fly through the text. This is a huge time-saver if you (or your students) are researching a lot of material. You'll be surprised how much information you retain. Then scroll back through the article, and use Liner highlight important points.
I've got some really great, easy tools to recommend in this post that will help you techify your classroom next school year! I'm sharing with you two apps, two add-ons, and two extensions that you can use. This post is part of my Summer Professional Development series, so click through to read about these tech tools and keep up with the rest of the series!
A word of caution here--if you are teaching ESL and struggling learners, do not use Sprint Reader. It will frustrate them. Select an extension that will read the webpage aloud to them instead, such as Read Aloud. The text can even be read in different languages!

How do you techify your class? What are your favorite apps, add-ons, and extensions? Leave a comment below to let me know. And don't for get to check back in next week to learn how to turn your vacation into a lesson with tech!




Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Email Format

Back to Top